Citation

Discussion Paper Details

Please find the details for DP16385 in an easy to copy and paste format below:

Full Details   |   Bibliographic Reference

Full Details

Title: Machine Learning and Mobile Phone Data Can Improve the Targeting of Humanitarian Assistance

Author(s): Emily Aiken, Suzanne Bellue, Joshua Blumenstock, Dean S. Karlan and Christopher Udry

Publication Date: July 2021

Keyword(s): Machine Learning, mobile phone data, poverty and targeting

Programme Area(s): Development Economics and Public Economics

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), causing widespread food insecurity and a sharp decline in living standards. In response to this crisis, governments and humanitarian organizations worldwide have mobilized targeted social assistance programs. Targeting is a central challenge in the administration of these programs: given available data, how does one rapidly identify the individuals and families with the greatest need? This challenge is particularly acute in the large number of LMICs that lack recent and comprehensive data on household income and wealth. Here we show that non-traditional "big" data from satellites and mobile phone networks can improve the targeting of anti-poverty programs. Our approach uses traditional survey-based measures of consumption and wealth to train machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of poverty in non-traditional data; the trained algorithms are then used to prioritize aid to the poorest regions and mobile subscribers. We evaluate this approach by studying Novissi, Togo's flagship emergency cash transfer program, which used these algorithms to determine eligibility for a rural assistance program that disbursed millions of dollars in COVID-19 relief aid. Our analysis compares outcomes ?? including exclusion errors, total social welfare, and measures of fairness ?? under different targeting regimes. Relative to the geographic targeting options considered by the Government of Togo at the time, the machine learning approach reduces errors of exclusion by 4-21%. Relative to methods that require a comprehensive social registry (a hypothetical exercise; no such registry exists in Togo), the machine learning approach increases exclusion errors by 9-35%. These results highlight the potential for new data sources to contribute to humanitarian response efforts, particularly in crisis settings when traditional data are missing or out of date.

For full details and related downloads, please visit: https://cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=16385

Bibliographic Reference

Aiken, E, Bellue, S, Blumenstock, J, Karlan, D and Udry, C. 2021. 'Machine Learning and Mobile Phone Data Can Improve the Targeting of Humanitarian Assistance'. London, Centre for Economic Policy Research. https://cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=16385