DP15599 Monetary Policy and Inequality

Author(s): Asger Lau Andersen, Niels Johannesen, Mia Jørgensen, José Luis Peydró
Publication Date: December 2020
Date Revised: December 2020
Keyword(s):
JEL(s):
Programme Areas: Public Economics, Financial Economics, Monetary Economics and Fluctuations
Link to this Page: cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=15599

We analyze the distributional effects of monetary policy on income, wealth and consumption. For identification, we exploit administrative household-level data covering the entire population in Denmark over the period 1987-2014, including detailed information about income and wealth from tax returns, in conjunction with exogenous variation in the Danish monetary policy rate created by a long-standing currency peg. Our results consistently show that all income groups gain from a softer monetary policy, but that the gains are monotonically increasing in the ex-ante income level. Over a two-year horizon, a decrease in the policy rate of one percentage point raises disposable income by less than 0.5% at the bottom of the income distribution, by around 1.5% at the median income and by around 5% at the top. The effects on asset values through increases in house prices and stock prices are larger than the effects on disposable income by more than an order of magnitude and exhibit a similar monotonic income gradient. We show how all these distributional effects reflect systematic differences in the exposure to the direct and indirect channels of monetary policy. Consistent with the main results for disposable income and asset values, we also find that the effects on net wealth and consumption (car purchases) increase monotonically over the ex-ante income distribution. Our estimates imply that softer monetary policy increases income inequality by raising income shares at the top of the income distribution and reducing them at the bottom.