Discussion paper

DP19156 Long Term Effects of Political Violence on Attitudes: Evidence from the Second Intifada

This paper studies the long-term effects of politically motivated violence on individuals’ political attitudes focusing on the Second Intifada (2000 – 2005). We conduct a large-scale survey that measures Israelis’ attitudes today and elicits their places of residence since 1985. The survey allows us to measure individuals’ direct exposure to terrorism and to account for potential selective migration. This, in combination with the fact that individuals’ characteristics are balanced with respect to their exposure to terrorism, enables us to overcome identification concerns and provide credible estimates of the causal effects of the Intifada on attitudes. The results indicate that exposure to terrorism during the Second Intifada caused a persistent and substantial shift toward right-wing attitudes that is still observable two decades later. Thus, our analysis provides systematic empirical evidence supporting the view that the Second Intifada soured a generation of Israelis on the idea of peace.

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Citation

Klor, E, S Lahad and A Zussman (2024), ‘DP19156 Long Term Effects of Political Violence on Attitudes: Evidence from the Second Intifada‘, CEPR Discussion Paper No. 19156. CEPR Press, Paris & London. https://cepr.org/publications/dp19156